The field Lagrangian of Feng Shui

Much goes in the name of science in this country, and if I were to believe what I read, the rest of the world is not much different.

My personal favourite is Ravan and his Pushpak Viman (a flying machine that he used to kidnap women). Whenever priests, old men and the wise old men of the community described to me the greatness of the ancient Indian civilisation, all of them came to this inevitable conclusion – the western science is now trying to rediscover / reinvent / imitate what had been done in India 5000 years back (the number of years varies from person to person).

Look at the aeroplane. It’s not a modern invention at all! Ravan’s Pushpak Viman is proof enough that we had built the aeroplane first (notice the difference – the claim is not that we built a flying machine first, but that we built the aeroplane first). Also, all those arrows we read about in Ramayana and Mahabharata, they were actually missiles. Bramhastra must have been the nuclear missile.

The list is endless, What I have presented here are some of the simplest ones. The list of all the convolutions people work through to get at their desired result would merit a few fat volumes. I could write them here, except that the space in this post is too small.

When I was younger, I felt bad because I thought that this perspective originated from the desperate attempt of religion (or at least a part of it) to survive science by ingratiating itself.

But as I grew older, I realised that the origin was something much more fundamental and universal – our desperate attempt to feel superior in our continued effort not to acknowledge the reality in order to escape it. Religion here is a tool, serving its own need to survive as it serves in our need to protect our ego.

And not just religion, almost every other belief-system based on faith is trying to embrace science in its own way. Astrology, Vaastu Shaastra, Feng Shui, Pranic Healing, the list is endless. As I retrospect my childhood and think about how I was made to lose my faith in human rationality, I do not wonder that I became an existentialist so fast! Time and again it has been proved to me that society and culture can overcome intelligence and wisdom.

My other personal favourite is the one with Arghya (a physics graduate and my friend). In a spiritual gathering he was attending, a speaker talked about “mind-power being like a field that has great energy” (oops! try to reconcile these concepts of power, field and energy!).

His point, described in Arghya’s words, was, “… as it is a field it has waves in it and those waves travel and change peoples’ mind originating from some guy who’s meditating in the Himalayas and so on and so forth …”

At this point Arghya could not help asking that, “Is this field of thought a field in the same sense as used in Mathematics or Physics?”

The speaker very indignantly answered, “Yes my little child, they are just like the Electromagnetic Field and radio waves that your teachers teach you in Physics classes.”

It was only after this that Arghya mustered up his courage to ask – “In that case, what is the field Lagrangian for this field sir?”

He first allowed the speaker to say that he meant it in the same sense as in Physics, which he essential did because Arghya remembered vaguely that the speaker was a lawyer by profession!! But after a little more pick’n poke, Arghya received a full lecture on his lack of respect for the elders, for the Indian culture and the dumb arrogance of his generation in general.

I am sure the younger generation will come up with its own fad (or may be just inherit the old one in a new bottle), but I hope it’ll not be religion, even though the current trends imply otherwise.

Share:  

Incorrigible Introvert

I wouldn't pretend I have a worthy tale to tell, I have only the ramifications of a twisted mind to sell.
This entry was posted in Funny, India, Opinions, The Diary of a Fugitive. Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to The field Lagrangian of Feng Shui

  1. Preyas says:

    “The list is endless, What I have presented here are some of the simplest ones.”

    Apparently there was a talk at tifr in which the speaker quoted shlokas from a few Hindu texts to “prove” that we already had quantum mechanics at the time vedas and upanishads were written.

    I wonder if he advices budding string theorists to learn sanskrit first.

  2. shreevatsa says:

    Whenever priests, old men and the wise old men of the community described to me the greatness of the ancient Indian civilisation
    Really?

    None of what you describe has anything to do with religion at all, inasmuch as mythology is just literature of a certain kind.

    [BTW: here's a bizarre story :) It's incredibly absurd and relates to your story, and note that it has nothing to do with religion, again.]

  3. @shreevatsa
    1) I pointed it out in the post itself how I attributed the whole phenomenon to religion when I was young, and how my perspective changed as I grew older – But as I grew older, I realised that the origin was something much more fundamental and universal … Religion here is a tool, serving its own need to survive as it serves in our need to protect our ego.

    2) I strongly disagree with your opinion that none of what I have described has anything to do with religion at all.

    a) Just point out one Muslim/Christian/etc etc guy to me who would quote from Ramayana or Mahabharata to prove the greatness of the ancient Indian civilisation.

    b) Or equivalently, point out one Muslim/Christian/etc etc guy to me who would quote from anything at all in order to argue the greatness of the ancient Indian civilisation.

    I rest my case.

    3) The story you have listed doesn’t relate very much to my story, though it is relevant (and absurd!). Arthashastra is not a Hindu scripture. It can not even be called a Hindu text.

    It corroborates your valid point that it is the mythological quality of the text which makes us reach out for it when we are trying to exhibit the grand past.

    Here you confused the method of selection with the reason behind the selection. Religion is one of the driving forces behind these sentiments. That’s why you will find only the Hindus of India going ga ga over the Vedic Era, and I suspect you can find Muslims who reminisce about the Mughal era.

    Besides, people will not choose just about any mythological text. They’ll choose the one with the most religious value.

  4. san says:

    While all the claims of elders etc about ancient science may not be true and some may be mere figment of imagination…there is every chnace that some myths may be real facts at those times.So we cant just rubish all the claims of religious text/myths,unless ofcourse its plain ludicurous unscintific brain wave of some ancient writer.

  5. kivous says:

    lol dude that really happened with arghya? :D
    awesome …

  6. niraj says:

    what a right time i read your article ..

    just yesterday i had the same kind of discussion with a muslim from syria (actually a whole bunch of arabs) and they ‘proved’ to me that everything in quran is scientifically valid … why stress on being scientifically valid? does this not betray their grudging respect for scientific validity ?

    anyway initially the discussion was fun for me and i could spupress my laughter very hard … but gradually it became boring when it was increasingly becoming clear that their attempt was to convince me to accept their ‘truth’ and possibly convert me.

  7. niraj says:

    but this langrangian bit was really superb .. next time i am going to try this type of trick on them

  8. whoa! do tell us if something interesting come out of your encounters.

  9. Hi there, i read your blog from time to time and i own a similar one and i was just wondering if you get a lot of spam remarks? If so how do you protect against it, any plugin or anything you can recommend? I get so much lately it’s driving me mad so any help is very much appreciated.

Leave a Reply